icon-facebookicon-twittericon-youtubeicon-instagram

module DonateNow

Features & Reviews

Female lead in Virginia Opera's "Romeo & Juliet" reflects on characters' ability to love

April Phillips Correspondent

Perhaps no love story has so captured the hearts of young and old across centuries like that of Romeo and Juliet. Since Shakespeare’s play was published in 1597, it has been read, performed, adapted, and, in some cases, shamelessly copied.

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, opera fans and hopeless romantics alike can celebrate with Virginia Opera’s production of one of the more-beloved adaptations of the story, Charles Gounod’s 1867 French opera. “Romeo & Juliet” returns to Hampton Roads today.

Fairfax: Sweet Dreams to Entice “Romeo and Juliet” at the George Mason University Center for the Arts.

By David Siegel

Fall in love again this Valentine’s weekend with “Romeo and Juliet.” The ultimate in passionate romance and profound love in the face of adversity “will transfix audiences, this time as a moving opera,” said Bernard Uzon, director, Virginia Opera’s “Romeo and Juliet” soon at the George Mason University Center for the Arts. The production is a major collaboration between Virginia Opera and Opera Carolina.

Virginia Opera Brings “Romeo & Juliet” to Norfolk

Posted: February 1, 2016 By Virginia Opera

Virginia Opera, The Official Opera Company of the Commonwealth of Virginia, is proud to present “Romeo & Juliet,” a new level of artistic collaboration with our partner in this production, Opera Carolina.

‘Romeo & Juliet’: A beautiful production by Opera Carolina

Posted: The final duet. Jon Silla BY PHILLIP LARRIMORE Correspondent-JANUARY 25, 2016 6:02 PM

“Romeo and Juliet” has inspired more great music than any other play known to man, ranging from Tchaikovsky’s gobsmacked concert fantasy to Prokofiev’s doom-laden ballet (not to mention masterpieces by Bellini, Berlioz, and Bernstein). Gounod’s “Romeo et Juliette” (1867), presented in a new production by Opera Carolina, has both delicacy and strength of feeling, surprising flashes of Gallic wit, gossamer orchestration, and high hurdles for its principal parts. It has never entirely faded from the repertoire, but its revival is an event.